Unofficial Olympic Sports

Before digging deeper into the so-called unofficial Olympic sports, let’s do a bit of background work.

Unfortunately, the Olympic Games which were meant to be celebrated in Tokyo next month, have been postponed to next year due to the coronavirus crisis.

However, there’s no reason to worry. Life challenges us every single day so that every one of us has the chance to take part in their own Olympic Games, a totally personalised experience.

Yes, you’ve read it properly. Forget about pole vaulting or synchronised swimming. Think about yawning with your eyes open or putting your contact lenses on with your eyes closed.

There are small daily victories that, unfortunately, are still labelled as unofficial Olympic sports.

  • Blowing your nose when it’s windy.
  • Typing on your phone at high speed with extremely long fake nails.
  • Holding a child in your arms for an extended period of time.
  • 200 metres sprint with obstacles (optional) towards the bus stop.
  • Sprinting to reach the first available seat before the bus starts again.
  • Trying not to lose balance in the underground or bus while standing up and when you have nowhere to hold on to.
  • Changing nappies in 15 seconds.
  • Changing the duvet cover.
  • Bring the washing inside when it rains.
  • Freestyle artistic sliding (falling is optional) on wet or icy pavement.
  • Stacking your grocery in the bag in 15 seconds, placing the heaviest and sturdiest items at the bottom and working from there, leaving the lightest and more delicate items for the top.
  • Juggling tangerines.
  • Slaloming on a Saturday afternoon on the busy Princes Street, zigzagging any obstacles.
  • Playing Twister.

Visible Fictions Keeps Creativity Alive During Lockdown

Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Over 100 people joined the Visible Fictions online event Phone Fictions Watch Party that took place on Tuesday the 28th of April at 3 pm on Facebook.

Dougie Irvine, Artistic Director of Visible Fictions, gave some background on the project.

“The premise was really simple. We asked artists from all over Scotland to pitch ideas to us for short stories that could be filmed from the comfort of their own home using their mobile phones.”

“All we asked is that they would be entertaining and uplifting.”

Irvine said they aimed to commission 10 films but ended up choosing 15: “The quality of the pitches from artists across the nation were so fantastic that we knew we had to make more.”

The family-friendly online event showcased diverse art forms such as stop motion animation, original music, sketches, and monologues.

Halfway through the show, Sophie Ochojna, Marketing and Development Manager for Visible Fictions, talked about the prospects of the company.

“If the restrictions are lifted and we’re allowed to, we’re going to be touring a new production this autumn around Scotland.-

“It’s by playwriter Morna Young and it’s called The Squawk Talk Secrets, suitable for families with children over seven and up.”

Ochojna said the tour would include community venues, theatres, and schools.

During the watch party, viewers could post real-time comments.

In the comical piece “Clover Light Field” by James Beagon, food and toilet paper mysteriously disappeared in a flat.

Darrel Williams commented: “Excellent – just how I’m feeling.”Laura Kwiatkowski said “Wow what amazing creativity with an avocado!” after watching Elspeth Chapman‘s piece. It was a stop motion animation of some hands carving faces out of avocado seeds.